history student on hikeWhen choosing a Pathway, we encourage you to select at least four courses from the recommended lists.  Doing so will ensure that you obtain sufficient grounding in the region or topic covered in the Pathway. 

You do not have to follow a Pathway to be a history major or take history classes. Pathways are designed to assist you in selecting courses within the major and highlight the departments strengths.  If you do not wish to specialize in one area, you can also choose to take any of the 300-level content history courses that interest you.

Before selecting courses, you should always review the History BS, BA, and Teacher Education programs of study and meet with your advisor. Courses in each Pathway are offered on a rotating basis and are not offered every semester. Before selecting courses, you should always review the History BS, BA, and Teacher Education programs of study and meet with your advisor.

The goals of these Pathways are to:

  1. Assist students in selecting courses to fulfill the B.S. and B.A. in History and the B.S. in History with an Emphasis in Teacher Education. 
  2. Assist students in selecting courses that meet their needs and interests.
  3. Assist students in developing a focused curriculum that will help them prepare for graduate school and employment.

*In all cases, Pathways are designed to help students find direction within the major, but they do not constitute an official certification or credential.  Therefore, the chosen Pathway will not be listed on the transcript.

 

Recommended Pathways

 

Global History

Courses in global history explore the connections, commonalities, and differences between civilizations that have shaped the contemporary world. Courses in this area reveal how “culture” is not something that simply begins and ends with a particular group of people or time period, but comes into being through interconnections and borrowings across space and time among multiple groups of people. For instance, by taking these courses you will see how ancient religious beliefs and practices impact contemporary culture and politics, such as in Roman and Christian contributions to an understanding of what constitutes a “just war,” or how a combination of Western, Chinese, and indigenous beliefs and practices led to the creation of modern Japan.

In addition to the general education core, the B.S. and B.A. in History and the B.S. in History with an Emphasis in Teacher Education, students who follow the Global History Pathway are encouraged to select a minimum of four classes from the list below.  Doing so will ensure that you obtain sufficient grounding in Global History. 

RECOMMENDED COURSES
HIST 307 Vietnam
HIST 326 Ancient World
HIST 327 The Early Middle Ages
HIST 328 The High Middle Ages
HIST 329 The Late Middle Ages
HIST 355 Late Antiquity
HIST 363 World Christianity from 1500
HIST 365 Religion and Warfare
HIST 370 Modern East Asia
HIST 375 Modern China
HIST 376 Modern Japan
HIST 377 Modern Korea
HIST 383 Warfare Through the Ages
HIST 441

Special Topics in History (when related to Global History)

 

Europe: Ancient to Renaissance

Courses in pre-modern European history explore the culture, institutions, belief-systems, and intellectual life of societies on that continent from prehistory to c.1600AD/CE in order to understand better the early history of the most determinative element of modern North American civilization.  The connections, commonalities, and differences encountered across this historical continuum of classical antiquity, the middle ages, and the renaissance have also contributed to shaping contemporary Europe as well as the contemporary world in its languages, literatures, social mores, artifacts, art-forms, architectures, legal and political systems, societal structures, religions, and philosophies.

In addition to the general education core, the B.S. and B.A. in History and the B.S. in History with an Emphasis in Teacher Education, students who follow the Global History Pathway are encouraged to select a minimum of four classes from the list below.  Doing so will ensure that you obtain sufficient grounding in European History.

RECOMMENDED COURSES
HIST 326 Ancient World
HIST 327 The Early Middle Ages
HIST 328 The High Middle Ages
HIST 329 The Late Middle Ages
HIST 330 Robin Hood
HIST 355 Late Antiquity
HIST 363 World Christianity from 1500
HIST 365 Religion and Warfare
HIST 441

Special Topics in History (when related to European History)

 

US History

Many students are drawn to the study of American history; after all, through learning about our nation’s history they are better able to understand our nation today. Students taking courses in the U.S. History pathway will come to appreciate the unique and laudable aspects of the United States, described by John Winthrop as a “City Upon a Hill.” But the United States has a fascinating and complex history. The foundational principles of democracy, liberty, and equality mean different things to different people, and have evolved over time.

Much of America’s history is found in the story of the under-represented: racial and ethnic minorities, women, Native Americans, the LGBTQ community, and others who even today struggle to achieve true “equality.” The United States has also been described as “a nation of immigrants,” people from around the globe and their descendants, whose diverse and varied experiences have resulted in the development of many national identities within a single state. Yet these people have a similar shared experience as Americans. The American story is one of division and unity, of progress and poverty, of the “American dream” and an often less inviting reality.

When taking courses in US history, you will examine the diverse cultural, political, and economic issues and events that created division and contention and simultaneously create a unique national identity.

In addition to the general education core, the B.S. and B.A. in History and the B.S. in History with an Emphasis in Teacher Education, students who follow the Global History Pathway are encouraged to select a minimum of four classes from the list below.  Doing so will ensure that you obtain sufficient grounding in U.S. history.

RECOMMENDED COURSES
HIST 307 Vietnam
HIST 310 Colonial America
HIST 314 The New South
HIST 315 History of South Carolina
HIST 316

History of the Black Experience

HIST 317 The Civil Rights Movement
HIST 344 Sport in American History
HIST 345 United States History, 1877-1921: The Gilded Age and Progressive Era
HIST 346 United States History, 1920s-1945: Prosperity, Depression, and War
HIST 347

The United States and the Cold War, 1945-1991

HIST 348 US Cultural History since 1900
HIST 349 1968: America and the World
HIST 385 Local and Oral History
HIST 386 Memory and Memorialization
HIST 390 America’s Rise to World Power: US Foreign Relations, 1776 - 1912
HIST 391

America as a World Power: US Foreign Relations from 1912 to the Present

HIST 392 Spies and Lies: The US Espionage Establishment: 1942-1963
HIST 441

Special Topics in History (when related to US history)

 

American South

The American South’s distinctive historical experience makes it worthy of in-depth scholarly exploration.  At Lander you can dig deep into the South’s past.  In doing so you will learn about the region’s significant influence on national and international affairs, economics, literature, music, art, sports, religion, and race and gender relations.  Join other students who are taking classes that examine the South’s Native American life, its role as a lucrative collection of English colonies, the antebellum period, and the American Civil War.  And come to learn about how the region transitioned from the New South to the Sun Belt during the twentieth century.

In addition to the general education core, the B.S. and B.A. in History and the B.S. in History with an Emphasis in Teacher Education, students who follow the Global History Pathway are encouraged to select a minimum of four classes from the list below.  Doing so will ensure that you obtain sufficient grounding in the history of the American South.

RECOMMENDED COURSES
HIST 310 Colonial America
HIST 311 Civil War and Reconstruction, 1850-1877
HIST 314 The New South
HIST 315 History of South Carolina
HIST 316 History of the Black Experience
HIST 317 The Civil Rights Movement
HIST 385 Local and Oral History
HIST 386 Memory and Memorialization
HIST 441

Special Topics in History (when related to the American South)

 

Cultural Diversity and Social Change

People around the globe have developed unique religions, languages, foods, moral values, political systems, and economies.  The varied and complex cultural differences have created many opportunities and challenges.  Diversity has opened doors to innovation and offered people multiple means of understanding and grappling with complex issues.  Yet the same differences that allow for creativity also generate challenges.  Even people who welcome diversity can run into conflict with each other because they see the world differently.

Given the globalization of our society, we are faced with changes that require understanding of differences and a need to develop empathy, respect, and cooperation.  At Lander you can take classes that examine issues related to race and gender, and that explore the varied experiences of people who make up the international community.  You will also have the opportunity to explore how social change occurs over time.  Classes at Lander examine major and minor social and political movements that have resulted in the gradual move towards equality and the backlash against change.

In addition to the general education core, the B.S. and B.A. in History and the B.S. in History with an Emphasis in Teacher Education, students who follow the Global History Pathway are encouraged to select a minimum of four classes from the list below.  Doing so will ensure that you obtain sufficient grounding in cultural diversity and social change.

RECOMMENDED COURSES
HIST 310 Colonial America
HIST 314 The New South
HIST 315 History of South Carolina
HIST 316

History of the Black Experience

HIST 317 The Civil Rights Movement
HIST 326 Ancient World
HIST 327 The Early Middle Ages
HIST 328 The High Middle Ages
HIST 329 The Late Middle Ages
HIST 330 Robin Hood
HIST 344 Sport in American History
HIST 345 United States History, 1877-1921: The Gilded Age and Progressive Era
HIST 346 United States History, 1920s-1945: Prosperity, Depression, and War
HIST 347

The United States and the Cold War, 1945-1991

HIST 348 US Cultural History since 1900
HIST 349 1968: America and the World
HIST 355 Late Antiquity
HIST 363 World Christianity from 1500
HIST 370 Modern East Asia
HIST 375 Modern China
HIST 376 Modern Japan
HIST 377 Modern Korea
HIST 441

Special Topics in History (when related to cultural diversity and social change)

 

War and Society

In courses in the War and Society pathway, students will study the roles of soldiers and leaders as well as wartime tactics and strategy. But wars involve much more than the battlefield experience. Such courses also explore the diplomatic dimensions of war, and peace; the avoidance of war and “roads not taken;” and the experiences of civilians, veterans, and other groups touched by war.  However, wars do not occur in a vacuum.  They have a significant effect on society and vice versa.  Political, social, and economic values and systems are the root causes of wars and play essential roles in how they are conducted and in their outcomes.

At Lander you can take courses that explore international approaches to war as well as courses that focus on specific conflicts such as the American Civil War.  

In addition to the general education core, the B.S. and B.A. in History and the B.S. in History with an Emphasis in Teacher Education, students who follow the Global History Pathway are encouraged to select a minimum of four classes from the list below.  Doing so will ensure that you obtain sufficient grounding in the history of war and society.

RECOMMENDED COURSES
HIST 307 Vietnam
HIST 310 Colonial America
HIST 311 Civil War and Reconstruction, 1850-1877
HIST 326 Ancient World
HIST 327 The Early Middle Ages
HIST 328 The High Middle Ages
HIST 329 The Late Middle Ages
HIST 330 Robin Hood
HIST 345 United States History, 1877-1921: The Gilded Age and Progressive Era
HIST 346 United States History, 1920s-1945: Prosperity, Depression, and War
HIST 347

The United States and the Cold War, 1945-1991

HIST 349 1968: America and the World
HIST 355 Late Antiquity
HIST 365 Religion and Warfare
HIST 370 Modern East Asia
HIST 375 Modern China
HIST 376 Modern Japan
HIST 377 Modern Korea
HIST 383

Warfare Through the Ages

HIST 390 America’s Rise to World Power: US Foreign Relations, 1776 - 1912
HIST 391

America as a World Power: US Foreign Relations from 1912 to the Present

HIST 392 Spies and Lies: The US Espionage Establishment: 1942-1963
HIST 441

Special Topics in History (when related to war and society)