News Releases

  • Lakelands social studies teachers dive into American History

    In September, 55 social studies teachers from the Lakelands area received a sneak preview of what they can look forward to as participants in the new Teaching American History in the Lakelands program, which is being funded by a $991,000 grant from the Federal Government. Open to 3rd-, 4th-, 5th-, 8th- and 11th-grade social studies teachers in Greenwood, Laurens, Abbeville and McCormick County school districts, the program's goal is to provide teachers with extensive knowledge of various periods in American History, while also providing guidance in teaching methods and lesson planning.
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  • Taylor-Colbert Named Dean of Arts and Humanities at Lander University

    Is it possible to be a people person, yet hold people to a high standard? Dr. Alice Taylor-Colbert, Lander University's new dean of the College of Arts and Humanities, would say yes.
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  • Lander participates in annual S.C. Historical Association meeting

    Lander University was well represented when the South Carolina Historical Association held its annual meeting in March at the Department of Archives and History in Columbia. Four students, five current and retired faculty members and a Lander graduate attended, and some had leading roles in the meeting.
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  • Lander History Honor Society receives award for excellence

    Student members of the history honor society at Lander University have won bragging rights again after receiving another award as one of the best chapters in the country. Lander's Xi-Epsilon Chapter of Phi Alpha Theta received the 2009 Nels. A. Cleven Award, which is given to chapters that have been designated as one of the best five times or more. Xi-Epsilon has been selected as a best chapter annually for more than a dozen years from among chapters at colleges and universities that have enrollments of less than 3,000 students. There are more than 820 Phi Alpha Theta chapters nationwide.
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  • Lander's Witherspoon honored as scholar and author

    Lander University assistant professor of history Dr. Kevin Witherspoon has presented scholarly papers and topics at international conferences, such as The Legacy of 1968 in Philadelphia, Pa., and the North American Society of Sports Historians (NASSH) Annual Conference. He was the keynote speaker at the Speed City 40th anniversary celebration of Tommie Smith and John Carlos' Olympic medal stand protest in October 2008. His first book, "Before the Eyes of the World: Mexico and the 1968 Olympic Games," was released by Northern Illinois Press in July 2008.
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  • Lander history professor participates in international conference

    Dr. Robert C. Figueira, professor of history at Lander University, recently took part in an international colloquium in Paris that was dedicated to the history of papal legates from the 11th through 16th centuries. As a research scholar in medieval history, Figueira was invited to address the first session of the conference.
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  • Ramsey receives book award from South Carolina Historical Society

    Dr. William Ramsey, chair of Lander University's Department of History and Philosophy, has been selected as the winner of the 2008 George C. Rogers Jr. Book Award, sponsored by the South Carolina Historical Society.
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  • Foundations of patriotism: students unearth the American Revolution at Ninety Six Historic Site

    The day was May 21, 1781, and Gen. Nathanael Greene had arrived in the small town of Ninety Six located in the backcountry of South Carolina. He traveled in the company of more than 1,000 patriot soldiers. The task before these men was difficult but it was clear - to fell the British loyalist forces securing the town.
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  • Do you know the way to San Jose?

    On the evening of Oct. 16, 1968, two black U.S. athletes, Tommie Smith and John Carlos, accepted medals for the 200 meter race at the Olympics in Mexico City. As they stepped on the riser to be recognized, Smith and Carlos lowered their heads and raised their fists, staging a protest that drew attention to human rights issues in the United States and across the globe. October 2008 marked the 40th anniversary of this moment in history.
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  • A spark that changed the course of Southern American history: New book sifts through the ashes of the Yamasee War

    Looking back at a time when South and North Carolina were one, when many Native Americans struggled to rid the land of their new neighbors from across the Atlantic and when a colony called Georgia was put in place as a line of defense for early Carolinians, the first lecture in Lander University's 2008-2009 Distinguished Speaker Series will reveal the events leading up to, surrounding and following the Yamasee War between southeastern Native American tribes and South Carolinians.
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  • Witherspoon's new book sheds light on 1968 Olympics

    At a plaza in the Tlatelolco district of Mexico City on Oct. 2, 1968, Mexican students congregated in protest. Their goal, to draw attention to the lacking democratic processes of the Mexican government. But their voices were abruptly and violently silenced. In the afternoon, Mexican soldiers blocked the exits to the plaza and opened fire on the crowd killing around 300 protesters. It was ten days before the opening of the 1968 Mexico City Olympics.
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  • Zimbabwe: a nation weeps at the hands of a dictator

    In 1985 the former Zimbabwean director of National Museums and Monuments wrote a letter to a Zimbabwean newspaper, the Sunday Mail, explaining the circumstances of his resignation a few months prior. The letter criticized unreasonable behavior on behalf of Zimbabwean government officials, to be more specific he referred to one official as a "barbarian." The publication of the letter resulted in the paper's editor being fired and led to the former director's decision to leave Zimbabwe to ensure his own safety.
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