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Summer Training

Airborne School:

Location: Ft. Benning, Georgia
Length: 3 weeks

The Basic Airborne Course is a three-week training program conducted by the Airborne Department, USAIC, Fort Benning, GA that trains students the use of the parachute as a means of combat deployment. Successful completion qualifies cadets to wear the Parachutist Badge.

You begin your first week on the ground, learning the basics of parachute landings, and start a vigorous training program. During the second week, called tower week, proper exiting of the plane will be mastered. As a cadet, you will be then given the opportunity to parachute from a 250 foot high tower. The third and final week is the jump week. Cadets make five jumps from either a C-130 or C-141, including one night jump and two combat jumps with full combat gear.

Air Assault School:

Location: Ft. Campbell, Kentucky

Length: 10 days

The AAS is a course of instruction that trains cadets on Combat Assault Operations involving associated equipment and U.S. Army rotary-wing aircraft. Successful completion qualifies cadets to wear the Air Assault Badge.

This is available at a number of installations, but the largest is located at the air assault home of Ft. Campbell, Kentucky. This eleven day course is very demanding both physically and mentally, involving obstacle courses and several long ruck marches. You will learn the basics of aircraft familiarization and recognition, slingload operations, and rappelling.

Robin Sage

The Robin Sage exercise provides cadets with an interest in Infantry and/or Special Forces an opportunity to serve as squad members within "G" bands. There are 15 "G" bands consisting of three to four cadets, 15-20 regular Army personnel and one "G" Chief. The "G" band conducts link-up operations with Special Forces Student Operational Detachment Alphas, receives specific training and conduct combat and sustainment operations. Over a three-week period this program provides the cadets with opportunities to learn and grow as potential leaders. Areas to which cadets are exposed: Troop Leading Procedures, Mission Planning (Warning, Patrol and Frag orders), Small Unit Tactic (Raids, Ambushes, Recons), Air Operations (Drop and Landing Zones and Message pick-up), Basic Field Craft (Survival, Expedient Navigation), Demolition, Medical, Communications and Weapons. The location for this exercise is Camp Mackall, North Carolina.

Pre-Combat Diver Qualification Course:

The most highly selective program available to cadets, the Combat Diver Qualification Course (CDQC) has less than fifteen cadet slots each year. This means that they only select the best of the best cadets. The training is physically and mentally exhausting, so preparation above and beyond the basic requirements of the school is mandatory. To get accepted into CDQC, one must complete a Pre-CDQC course. Pre-CDQC training includes an APFT and pool events, including a 25 meter sub-surface swim, a 50 meter sub-surface swim, clump retrieval, two minute water tread, weight belt swim, underwater knot tying, ditching and dawning of equipment, treading water for five minutes with a weight belt and twin 80 air cylinders, and drown proofing.

Mountain Warfare School:

Location: Jericho, Vermont
Length: 2 weeks

A program conducted at the Ethan Allen Firing Range, Jericho, VT. The course teaches cadets the skills needed to operate in a mountainous environment during the summer and fall.

Mountain Warfare introduces you to the techniques and tactics required to operate in a mountainous environment under hostile conditions. The emphasis is on field exercises where you learn mountain-related skills. The instruction includes advanced navigational training, special mobility training (with special operations forces mountaineering equipment), and mountain tactical instruction.

Northern Warfare Cadet Orientation Course:

Location: Ft. Wainwright, Alaska
Length: 2 weeks

A program conducted at the Northern Warfare Training Center at Fort Wainwright, AK. The course is designed to train cadets in the skills required for conducting military operations in typical mountainous terrain found throughout the world. Special emphasis is placed on basic military mountaineering skills.

This course focuses on mobility in mountainous terrain, rappelling, and climbing skills. The training is demanding both physically and mentally but also extremely rewarding. Those who live up to the challenge come away with not only a vast knowledge of climbing skills but also a new level of self confidence born from facing adversity and overcoming it. (Northern Warfare School Website)

Combat Survival Training:

CST is a 20 day program that affords the cadet the opportunity to practice employing the principles, procedures, techniques, and equipment that enhance survival and evasion prospects, regardless of hostile or adverse climate conditions.

United Kingdom Officer Training Camp:

A three-week program hosted by British Army ROTC counterparts. UKOTC provides cadets the opportunity to conduct ROTC training with a foreign nation.

Cadet Troop Leader Training (CTLT):

CTLT provides select Advanced Camp graduates the opportunity to increase their leadership experience by assignments to platoon leader or like positions with Active Army units or with government agencies for three weeks (CONUS) to four weeks (OCONUS). Refer to Annex A, Figure 1 (CTLT Training Opportunities). You may also find yourself anywhere in the country, or overseas, involved in the Cadet Troop Leadership Training Program. This internship program places you in actual Army units acting as a real Lieutenant. This two or three week challenge is a definite learning experience, allowing you to gain a perspective on what you will be facing as future officer. Generally, you are placed in a platoon leader position, leading 30+ soldiers and responsible for millions of dollars of equipment. You receive a rate of pay and allowance similar to that at NALC, you stay at the Bachelor Officer Quarters on that specific base, you train and lead soldiers, and receive an OER upon completion of the program. If you are assigned to a unit on jump status, and you are already airborne qualified, you may participate in unit jumps on a permissive basis if approved in advance. CTLT is the best way to familiarize yourself with a branch before having to choose your branch preferences during the accessions process at the beginning of the MS IV year.

Drill Cadet Leader Training (DCLT):

Training is conducted in Basic Training and One Station Unit Training (OSUT) for four weeks. Cadets work closely with Drill Sergeants as they train soldiers in basic skills. The cadets leave with an NCOER.

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